Saturday, May 19, 2007

State Small Wind Electric Systems Guides

The guides listed above provide consumers with information to help them determine whether small wind electric systems can provide all or a portion of the energy needed for homes or businesses based on wind resource, energy needs, and economics.

Topics include how to:

*** Make a home more energy efficient
*** Choose the correct turbine size
*** Determine whether enough wind resource exists
*** Choose the best site for a turbine
*** Connect a system to the utility grid, and
*** Whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy

In addition, the guides include a list of contacts for more information.

Current Guides

Small Wind Electric Systems: An Alaska Consumer's Guide
(April 2007)
[http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy07osti/41212.pdf]

Small Wind Electric Systems: An Illinois Consumer's Guide (April 2007)
[http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy07osti/41208.pdf]

Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Dakota Consumer's Guide (April 2007)
[http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy07osti/41392.pdf]

Small Wind Electric Systems: A South Dakota Consumer's Guide
(April 2007)
[http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy07osti/41226.pdf]

Small Wind Electric Systems: A Vermont Consumer's Guide (April 2007)
[http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy07osti/41219.pdf]

Source [http://www.nrel.gov/]

1 comment:

EcoPedro said...

Here's another great resource for small wind: http://MariahPower.com

Mariah Power boasts some innovative "plug 'n produce" technology for easy and affordable wind generation:

About Mariah Power
Based in Reno, Nevada, Mariah Power provides low-cost, low-noise, attractive wind power appliances for use with residential, business, and commercial buildings. The company’s patented technology maximizes energy conversion from wind into the electric power, regardless of changing wind speed and direction. The company’s first vertical axis wind power appliance, Windspire®, is now available for shipment. For more information, visit www.mariahpower.com.